Alert

PGY1/PGY2 Pharmacotherapy

Overview

The combined 24 month PGY1/PGY2 Pharmacotherapy Residency Program is designed to develop practitioners who have the knowledge and skills necessary to provide pharmacotherapy services across diverse patient populations and in a variety of practice settings as members of multidisciplinary teams. The first year of the program mirrors the UNC PGY1 Pharmacy Residency, providing a strong foundation in many patient care areas, including acute care medicine, critical care, ambulatory care, and pediatrics. More information about the PGY1 year can be found here. The second year of the program builds upon these skill sets and is designed to fulfill the learning objectives identified in the ASHP Supplemental Standard and Learning Objectives for Residency Training in a Specialized Area of Pharmacy Practice.

The primary training goal of the program is to ensure that the graduate can apply decision-making skills, literature evaluation abilities and pharmacotherapy knowledge base to deliver safe, efficacious and cost-effective medication management to patients across a variety of practice areas, including acute care, ambulatory care and critical care. The primary teaching goal of the program is for the resident to develop comfort and expertise in provision of pharmaceutical education to health care professionals, pharmacy learners, patients and the community at large. The primary professional development goal of the program is for the resident to cultivate a commitment to the profession of pharmacy, as well as personal and professional growth, as a self-directed, autonomous learner and a leader within the profession as a clinician, educator and researcher.

The graduating Pharmacotherapy Resident will be prepared to enter clinical practice as a pharmacotherapy specialist in acute care, ambulatory care or critical care environments. The graduate will be proficient in working as a member of multidisciplinary teams toward a common goal of stellar patient care. The resident will also have the baseline level of skills and experience to execute meaningful point-of-care research and to design and execute teaching activities in affiliation with a school of pharmacy.


RPD Contact Information:


Jesica Mangun, PharmD, BCPS

Residency Program Director, Combined PGY-1/PGY-2 Pharmacotherapy Residency
Clinical Pharmacist Practitioner, Family Medicine
Jesica.Mangun@unchealth.unc.edu

Patient Care

With the exception of longitudinal clinic and staffing experiences, patient care activities are designed as month-long rotations. All rotations are tailored to the resident’s interests, career goals and prior experience, with effort made to maintain relative balance between acute and ambulatory care experience. The pharmacotherapy residents will have the opportunity to work with pediatric, adult, and geriatric patient populations. A wide variety of rotations are available.

PGY1 Required Rotations:

  • General Medicine
  • Acute Care Medicine
  • Critical Care
  • Pediatrics
  • Ambulatory Care
  • Pharmacy Administration
  • Elective (3 months)*

PGY2 Required Rotations:*

Should allow for one preceptor to evaluate resident on two separate occasions (may overlap from PGY1 to PGY2 year)

  • Acute Care Medicine (3 months, one of which is the Family Medicine Inpatient Service)
  • Ambulatory Care Medicine (2 months, plus longitudinal clinic one half-day per week)
  • Critical Care (1 month)
  • Pediatrics (1 month)#
  • Elective (4 months)*

*Rotations will be selected based on resident’s interest area as well as alignment with residency goals

#May design unique experience based on resident’s interest area

Example Rotation Calendar

PGY-1
Practice Area
Specific Rotation
Longitudinal Clinic

July

Practice Management

Orientation/staffing

None

August

Acute Care

Family Medicine

None

September

Ambulatory Care

Solid Organ Transplant

None

October

Acute Care

Pediatric Pulmonary

None

November

Practice Management

Drug Information

None

December

Research

Research

None

January

Acute Care

Acute Psychiatry

None

February

Acute Care

Cardiology

None

March

Critical Care

Medicine ICU

None

April

Ambulatory Care

Family Medicine

None

May

Practice Management

Clinical Management

None

June

Acute Care

Internal Medicine Nephrology

None

PGY-2
Practice Area
Specific Rotation
Longitudinal Clinic

July

Acute Care

Internal Medicine Infectious Disease

½ day/ week (Family Medicine)

August

Ambulatory Care

Endocrine Clinic

½ day/ week (Family Medicine)

September

Critical Care

Pediatric ICU

½ day/ week (Family Medicine)

October

Acute Care

Internal Medicine Pulmonary

½ day/ week (Family Medicine)

November

Ambulatory Care

Geriatrics Clinic

½ day/ week (Family Medicine)

December

Practice Management

Research

½ day/ week (Family Medicine)

January

Acute Care/Amb Care

Bone Marrow Transplant

½ day/ week (Family Medicine)

February

Critical Care

Heart Failure/Cardiology ICU

½ day/ week (Family Medicine)

March

Acute Care

Internal Medicine Geriatrics/Hepatology

½ day/ week (Family Medicine)

April

Acute Care

Benign Hematology

½ day/ week (Family Medicine)

May

Practice Management

Academia

½ day/ week (Family Medicine)

June

Acute Care

Family Medicine

½ day/ week (Family Medicine)

Preceptors

Since the mission of Pharmacotherapy is to provide breadth of experience across a variety of therapeutic areas and patient care settings, all of the preceptors at UNC are potential preceptors for the Pharmacotherapy residency. With over 50 active preceptors, the PGY1/PGY2 Pharmacotherapy Residency Program offers a wealth of rotation opportunities to learn from exceptional clinicians.

Staffing Component

Residents will receive training and orientation to the department's services during the first few weeks of the program. During the PGY1 year, pharmacy practice responsibilities include staffing in decentralized or central pharmacist positions. This will shift in the PGY2 year to staffing in solely decentralized pharmacist positions. Staffing activities during both years include, but are not limited to, verifying patient-specific orders and medications, providing pharmacokinetic consults when requested, answering in-depth drug information questions, attending all adult codes as the pharmacy member of the code team, providing patient education and solving pharmacotherapy situations as they may arise. Over the course of each residency year, residents must complete an average of 400 hours of staffing. This commitment is fulfilled by staffing every third weekend and for three concentrated weeklong blocks distributed over the course of the year. Additionally, residents are also responsible for staffing during one of three major holiday blocks (Thanksgiving, Christmas, or New Year’s) and one minor holiday (Labor Day, MLK or Memorial Day). These requirements may be changed annually based on the needs of the department. Residents will also participate in the 24 hour pharmacy clinical on-call program.

Clinical On-Call Program

The department of pharmacy provides an on-call pager service to our physicians, nurses, and other clinical staff. While this service does not have an in-house on-call component, the residents do participate in answering on-call drug information requests 24 hours a day. The resident will field medicine, surgery, oncology and pediatric questions. The types of questions that are referred to the service are those that can require significant time to research, or a specialized knowledge base. Each resident will rotate through primary on-call responsibilities. While on-call, the resident will be available over a 24-hour period and will have specified back-up pharmacists to assist with difficult questions if needed.

Experience

Teaching Responsibilities and Opportunities

Each resident will earn an appointment with the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy as a Clinical Instructor and serve as a teaching assistant (TA) for the Pharmaceutical Care Lab (PCL) course in which residents work with second and third professional year students. A core group of 10 students will be assigned to each resident to engage in therapeutic case discussions and to instruct in the basics of physical assessment, patient counseling and written and verbal communications. Five hours are committed to this experience each week, including teaching, preparation, and grading of assignments. One semester of the PGY2 year has a TA experience outside of the PCL course. Examples of courses include the acute care elective, ambulatory care elective, administration elective, and foundations of patient care. Course assignment in based on the school needs in combination with resident’s interest area. Given the strong relationship with the School of Pharmacy, residents are provided with a variety of teaching opportunities throughout the program

Residents are offered the option to pursue completion of a teaching certificate which can be obtained during the PGY1 or PGY2 year. An application process is necessary to join the teaching certificate program, and if accepted, residents will be provided guidance on lectures, portfolio development and PCL participation to receive their certificate.

Leadership Opportunities

UNC residents are offered the option to pursue completion of a leadership certificate through participation in the UNC Pharmacy Residency Leadership Certificate Program, which can be completed during the PGY1 or PGY2 year. An application process is necessary to join the leadership certificate program, and if accepted, residents will be provided guidance on facilitating leadership-focused topic discussions, leadership in motion projects, mentorship, and other activities to receive their certificate.

Educational Opportunities

Both PGY1 and PGY2 residents are incorporated into a layered learning practice model with students on rotation at UNC Hospitals, co-residents, and clinical specialists. Our layered learning practice model has been piloted on several rotations in which learners of various levels participated on the same team. This model will continue to be offered on several rotations. Other educational opportunities include multidisciplinary teaching in the outpatient and inpatient setting, pod discussions, case conferences and student seminars. Pod discussions are topic discussions determined by preceptors ahead of time which can be led either by PGY2s on rotation or a preceptor specializing in that topic. Case conferences are interactive, didactic and case-based weekly opportunities headed by clinical specialists and presented by PGY2s and PGY1s to students and residents. Residents will present one UNC Case Conference during each residency year. The PGY1 resident is required to attend weekly case conferences and PGY2 resident have the option to attend depending on interest in the topic area. There are two student seminars presented each week covering a variety of timely topics with a focus on providing useful information for UNC practitioners. The resident is required to attend and evaluate a number of pharmacy student seminar presentations throughout the year. All residents will present a 45-minute ACPE-approved continuing education (CE) seminar once during each residency year. The ACPE-approved CE presentation is held once during the workday with an encore on an evening or weekend that is open for the public to attend.

Professional Meetings

PGY1 residents attend the NCAP Annual Convention in October and the Research in Education and Practice Symposium (REPS) in May. The majority of residents elect to attend the ASHP Midyear Clinical Meeting in December. The residents have the option of attending professional meetings other than the ASHP Midyear Meeting, such as the American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP) Annual Meeting. A travel stipend is awarded annually to assist with the cost of meeting registration and associated travel expenses.

Mentorship

The residency program at UNC has a strong history of mentorship and this ideal is built into nearly all aspects of residency training. Each resident will have multiple mentors for multiple purposes. Mentors are chosen by the residents for research projects, presentation development and personal mentorship. The personal mentor exists to guide the resident through the academic year. The mentor is an individual who can answer questions, provide feedback, and counsel residents on how to approach the many challenging parts of the residency year. Resident mentors participate in a program-wide resident progression committee that monitors the growth and development of residents over the course of the year.

Community Outreach

Residents participate in activities involving community outreach through participation in the Inter Faith Council (IFC) Shelter and the Student Health Action Coalition (SHAC). The IFC Shelter is a 30-bed facility that provides temporary, overnight housing and meals to those in need. In addition, the IFC shelter provides general and psychiatric clinics to be utilized by its residents. The SHAC clinic is the oldest student-coordinated health service in the U.S., providing free multidisciplinary, comprehensive medical care to the underserved community of Chapel Hill. Our residents volunteer at the clinics an average of 2-3 times during the year, helping to provide care to the patients. Participation in the clinics provides an excellent opportunity for residents to help disadvantaged patients with medication-related issues, physicians with medication-related decisions, and to precept students during the medication dispensing and counseling process.

Research and Publication

Each resident is expected to participate in a project that enhances these learning objectives: developing research criteria, seeking approval of criteria from the IRB, collecting and summarizing data, analyzing results, and presenting findings. To fulfill this requirement, each resident must complete a pharmacotherapy project, a medication-use evaluation (MUE), and an administrative or quality-improvement project. The ideas for these projects, which will be identified early in the year, will arise from interactions with the UNC Hospitals’ pharmacists and the UNC School of Pharmacy faculty. During the first half of the PGY1 year the resident will complete an MUE and the remainder of the PGY1 and PGY2 year will be dedicated to the pharmacotherapy project. Parts of these research projects will be presented at the University Health System Consortium (UHC) Annual Meeting, REPs, and/or at specified subspecialty meetings as determined by the resident and RPD. In addition to conducting and presenting research, residents are required to submit a manuscript for publication during both the PGY1 and PGY2 year. The resident is required to contribute to the work of an organizational committee related to medication use or policies / procedures surrounding medication use or pharmacy services, which is often accomplished through the administrative project.

Annual Residency Trip

Another highlight of the year is our residency trip. The residency trip provides an opportunity for the PGY1 residents to visit and learn about two other health care institutions, pharmacy departments and residency programs. They contact the programs and arrange tours, luncheons, etc. with the host institutions. This is always a fun trip and it allows for resident bonding and the creation of new professional contacts. Afterward, both PGY1 and PGY2 residents have a weekend bonding trip and go to the beach, hiking, whitewater rafting, shopping, etc. They then report back to our program about the site visits, which helps enrich both the residency program and the Department of Pharmacy.

Resident Evaluations

Evaluations are a large part of the residency process. At UNC, we utilize the ASHP-endorsed online evaluation system, PharmAcademic. Evaluations are built for each individual rotation, as well as for presentations, research, and staffing components of the program. Additionally, quarterly global evaluations are held with the program director and mentor to ensure progress on long term goals.

FAQ

Can I apply for both a PGY1 Pharmacy Practice Residency as well as the 24 month combined PGY1/PGY2 Pharmacotherapy Residency Program?

Yes

What residency certificate(s) will I receive at the conclusion of the program?

Residents who successfully complete the PGY1 and PGY2 year will be awarded with both a PGY1 certificate in pharmacy practice and a PGY2 certificate in pharmacotherapy. Therefore, close coordination with the PGY1 RPD and Pharmacotherapy RPD is incorporated.

What is the difference between Pharmacotherapy versus Internal Medicine?

Internal Medicine programs primarily prepare pharmacists to care for adults in the acute care setting. Although general medicine is a large part of Pharmacotherapy training, the residency develops pharmacists to provide comprehensive care to a broader range of patients (including pediatrics, geriatrics, men’s and women’s health) in the critical care, acute care and ambulatory care environments. The program allows flexibility for the resident to tailor the 24 month experience to his/her interests and career goals.

Will I have the opportunity to serve as a Clinical Pharmacist Practitioner?

PGY2 residents will have the opportunity to apply for a Clinical Pharmacist Practitioner (CPP) license. The CPP is a designation by the North Carolina Medical Board and Board of Pharmacy conferring approval to provide collaborative drug therapy management, including ordering labs and medication prescribing, under the direction of a licensed physician. Serving as a CPP enhances the longitudinal clinic experience by allowing the resident to better embed within the clinic, work more closely with a supervising physician, develop proficiency in clinic logistics, engage in the CPP licensing and privileging process, extend pharmacy care, and develop more autonomy.

What future career opportunities will the residency afford?

A majority of residents pursue clinical opportunities in ambulatory care settings (i.e. primary care clinics, transitions of care clinics, specialty clinics) and in acute care settings (i.e. internal medicine and family medicine inpatient services). In these roles, a majority of our graduates are now involved in residency training at their own institutions. Others have pursued academic careers at schools of pharmacy. Opportunities for residents upon completion of the UNC Training Program are abundant and represent a wide scope of practice styles and settings.

Application

Instructions for the 2016-2017 application process:

The PGY 1/2 Pharmacotherapy Program, as a new program, is not yet active in PhorCAS. We have submitted for precandidate status for the program, with hopes that we will have an active PhorCAS portal shortly. Please check back here before completing your application.

In the absence of PhorCAS access, applicants should plan to submit a paper application including all of the following:

  1. Curriculum vitae
  2. Letter of Intent
  3. Transcripts
  4. 3 letters of reference
  5. Answers to supplemental essay questions.


Materials must be received by January 8, 2017.

Please mail materials to the following address:

Jesica Mangun, PharmD, BCPS
RPD, Pharmacotherapy Residency Program
C/O Kamakshi Rao, PharmD
Clinical Manager, Pharmacy Residency Programs
101 Manning Drive, CB#7600, Pharmacy Dept.
Chapel Hill, NC 27514

For more information contact:

Residency Program Director, Combined PGY-1/PGY-2
Pharmacotherapy Residency
Clinical Specialist, Family Medicine

Current Residents

PGY-2

Erika LambertErika Lambert

PGY-1

Lauren BodeLauren Bode
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